Wilko scam

VXRL
3 min readSep 15, 2023

Some cybersecurity heads-up in the UK.

Dozens of stores expected to close after UK budget retailer (Wilko) fails to find new funding, putting 12,000 jobs at risk.

Shoppers have been warned to avoid a spate of fake websites attempting to scam bargain hunters by pretending to offer heavily discounted goods from the collapsed budget chain Wilko.

Wilko is no longer selling goods online and has stopped all home deliveries or click and collect services after calling in administrators from PricewaterhouseCoopers on 10 August as it ran short of cash. Goods are only available to buy directly in one of its 400 stores.

Ref:
https://www.theguardian.com/business/2023/aug/10/wilko-collapses-into-administration-after-rescue-talks-fail

Scam examples

Facebook Post

Ref: https://www.theguardian.com/money/2023/aug/21/scam-websites-lure-in-wilko-customers-with-offers-such-as-499-sofa

WhatsApp Message

I received the message earlier today, and realized there’re some issues on the website.

One of the scam websites: https://skirtclothes[.]com/collections/warehouse-clearance

Fake one, the logo is different.

Real one, you can see the “i” in the logo.

When we click into Contact Us, there is a company called AIMARK LTD

From https://malwaretips.com/blogs/aimark-ltd/, we learned that the websites related to AIMARK LTD are fake ones selling clothes, jewellery, and this one pretending to be Wilko. (Or The company is likely just named on the sites without their knowledge or consent. The real operators use shell companies like AIMARK LTD to appear more legitimate.)

It is reported that when clients make purchases on websites mentioning AIMARK LTD, they often end up with no product, imitations, or items that significantly deviate from the website’s descriptions and images.

By employing social engineering tactics like phishing, deceptive social media tactics, fabricated reviews, and ‘bait and switch’ schemes, AIMARK LTD’s counterfeit shopping platforms consistently deceive online deal-seekers.

As a normal user, you may take a look on the following tips:

Find Their Contact Info: Real shops usually list their phone number or address. If you can’t find these, it’s a red flag.

Too Cheap? Think Twice: If something’s price looks too good to be true, it probably is.

Check the Pictures and Words: Bad websites might use blurry photos or have lots of spelling mistakes.

What’s Their Return Policy? Real stores tell you how you can return items. If it’s hard to find or understand their policy, be careful.

Watch Out for Unexpected Ads or Emails: If you get random pop-ups or emails with amazing deals, be careful. They might be trying to trick you.

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VXRL

VXRL Team is founded by group of enthusiastic security researchers, providing information security services and contribute to the community. https://www.vxrl.hk